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Tips on how to build a strong mother-daughter bond

Tips on how to build a strong mother-daughter bond

Tips on how to build a strong mother-daughter bond

The relationship between a girl and her mother is so powerful, it affects everything from her health and self-esteem, to all her other relationships. 
 
Starting from a young age the mother-daughter bond shapes a woman and how she sees the world.
 
The mother-daughter relationship is the most powerful bond in the world, for better or for worse. It sets the stage for all other relationships.
 
Countless research studies show that no other childhood experience is as compelling as a young girl's relationship with her mother. Each of us takes in at a cellular level how our mother feels about being female, what she believes about her body, how she takes care of her health, and what she believes is possible in life.
 
Having three daughters I am conscious of this. I am also very aware that they are all very different yet I strive for my relationship to be as equal and as deep with each one of them.
 
There is a lot of research on the importance of bonding with your baby and the many benefits that it has. So, bonding with your baby seems an obvious. Just because your little one has grown a lot bigger and sassier doesn't mean your bond and connection with them is any less vital to their development.
 
Here are our top tips on ways to bond with your daughter-
 
Listen
It may seem like the obvious one but listening when your daughter tells you a story is a lot more important than you may realise. Even if you have heard the story 10 times. Listen and acknowledge it again and again. If you listen to the small things she will learn that you will be there for the big things too. 
 
Reading
We all know reading with children is a simple way to improve their language and reading skills. But studies shows that reading with children actually stimulates patterns of brain development responsible for connection and bonding.
This makes sense, considering story time usually involves cuddling, eye contact, and shared emotion. If you make reading together a priority in your home, you are without a doubt connecting with your child. 
Often children’s imaginations put them directly into the story. Talk about the book, possible outcomes and the feelings of these characters. Watch your relationship grow.

Play
Play comes naturally to children. It makes it an easy tool to use when building that bond with your little one. When parents enter their child's world and follow their lead in play, they open up the possibility for many positive outcomes, including taking on a different relationship role and seeing our children from a new perspective.
Often children will play out there subconscious thoughts through play. An amazing tool to try and get into their little minds.
Engaging in play together also gives our child the chance to view us as an ally and not as an opponent. Studies show that playing with children decreases attention seeking behaviours and separation anxiety by fulfilling their emotional needs.
 
Music
Whether listening to them play an instrument or dancing to the “Trolls" soundtrack together. (A favourite in our house!) Music offers lots of benefits for both parent and child, including connecting to our bodies and how they feel and also living in the moment. Your kids will be practicing mindfulness without even knowing it!
 
If you have a difficult relationship with your daughter It's never too late to repair your relationship
  • Try a counselling session on your own first to help you work out whether or not it will be helpful to attend counselling with your mother or daughter.
  • Sometimes it's not possible to repair things that happened years ago. Instead, focus on working out how you would like to treat each other now.
  • Even if your mother has passed away, if you have unresolved issues you could benefit from counselling sessions. Sometimes talking through the possibilities of why something might have occurred can help you get some perspective and even some closure.
 
Written by Laura Doyle, Staff Writer at Family Friendly HQ. Laura also blogs at Love, Life and Little Ones