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MRI Scans Show True Trauma to A Woman's Body About Giving Birth

MRI Scans Show True Trauma to A Woman's Body About Giving Birth

woman in labour
Latest research using an MRI shows the hard truth about giving birth.
 
MRI scans post childbirth allowed a team of researchers from the University of Michigan to observe that the injuries sustained by women during childbirth is comparable to the injuries sustained by athletes during a marathon!
 
The research team also found out that 15% of women giving birth sustain pelvic injuries that do not heal. According to their study posted at Michigan News, "childbirth is arguably the most traumatic event the human body can undergo."
 
The report also says that 41% of women who give birth suffer muscle tears and two-thirds experience muscle strains. 
 
Although the MRI scans show injuries, the research team does not recommend that all women should get MRI scans after giving birth. "We're not saying that every woman who gives birth needs an MRI nor that women should not do Kegel exercises," Janis Miller said, associate professor at the University Of Michigan School Of Nursing. "A key point is that if a woman is sensing that she has delayed recovery or unusual symptoms of discomfort or feels she just can't Kegel anymore, she should see a specialist."
 
“If an athlete sustained a similar injury in the field, she’d be in an MRI machine in an instant,” says Miller. “We have this thing where we tell women, ‘Well, you’re six weeks postpartum and now we don’t need to see you- you’ll be fine.’ But not all women feel fine after six weeks nor are ready to go back to work, and they aren’t crazy.“
 
The recovery period for most women who give birth is approximately six weeks but everyone is different. The Guardian reports that women who continue to feel pain in their pelvis and during sex three months after giving birth should seek a doctor. Miller, the associate professor at the U-M School of Nursing says "We have this thing where we tell women, 'Well, you're six weeks postpartum and now we don't need to see you - you'll be fine.' But not all women feel fine after six weeks nor are ready to go back to work, and they aren't crazy."
 
It is very important to note that for most women, childbirth leaves us with no long term injuries. Researcher Miller is quick to point out that they are not advocating MRIs after every birth, partly because the women in the study were selected for high-risk factors. What we're taking from this is to be mindful of the effects that childbirth could have on your body and if you feel that things are not right - don't hesitate to get checked out and request an MRI.